Youth Ministry

Women’s Ministry

The Youth Ministries Department is engaged in empowering Seventh-day Adventist youth to take the Advent Message to the world Now!

Ministry Overview

We are challenged by the prophetic words of one of our church’s premier youth “Young men and young women, can form companies, and as soldiers of Christ, enlist in the work, putting all your tact and skill and talent into the Master’s service, that you may save souls from ruin? Let there be companies organized in every church to do this work” (Signs of the Times, May 29, 1893)

Adventurers

The Adventurer Club is a Seventh-day Adventist Church-sponsored ministry open to all families of children in grades 1-4 who agree to keep the Adventurer Pledge and Law.

The mission of the Adventurer Club ministry is to serve an intercultural community of children from pre-kindergarten through fourth grade and their parents or guardians and assist Adventurer families in growing as followers of Jesus.

What is an Adventurer
An Adventurer is a child in grades 1-4. Each Adventurer is a unique and special person. Still there are several characteristics which are typical of Adventurer-age children.

Pathfinders

Who started Pathfinders?  The short answer is that no one person did, but rather that a diverse group of youth-focused, God-loving, ministry-minded individuals in various location created “Pathfinder-like” clubs in various locations that eventually grew into the ministry we now know as Pathfinders.

The first Pathfinder Club of record was in Anaheim, California directed by John McKim and Willa Steen. This club began in the late 1920’s and ran through the 1930’s.   In 1944 McKim died and the Steens had moved.   In 1930 Lester and Ione Martin with co-directors Theron & Ethel Johnston began a club in Santa Ana, California.

Both of these first clubs were in the Southeastern California Conference and encouraged by Youth Director Elder Guy Mann and his associate Laurance A. Skinner. For several years there were no clubs of record.

In 1946 John H. Hancock, then the youth director for Southeastern California Conference got a club going in Riverside, California. John designed the Pathfinder triangle emblem and got a ministerial student, Francis Hunt to direct the club. Both John and his wife Helen Hancock taught honors.

By 1947-48 Southern California Conference began having Pathfinder clubs – the first at Glendale, with Lawrence Paulson as director. About that same time, the Central California Conference, under the direction of Youth Director Henry T. Bergh, began their Pathfinder program — starting 23 clubs that first year.

Beginning with the God-directed program, called Pathfinder Clubs, in California, the General Conference of the Seventh-day Adventist church adopted the program. It thus, in 1950, became an official worldwide organization of the Adventist church, and grew rapidly.

Pathfinders is now a global ministry affecting thousands (if not millions) of young people worldwide.